Decision-making mojo: quiet mind and open heart

When we try to impose high-mindedness on our decisions, we may inadvertently find ourselves invested in being right and in getting “good” results. When we make decisions instead from a quiet place, we tend to be less invested in being right. We decide with humility and with open minds and hearts, which leaves us free to learn and evolve as the consequences of our decisions play out.

Intensity and Legitimacy Are Not the Same: How Not to Be Hornswoggled by Strong Feelings

Tantrums are fierce but temporary in childrenIn the course of our lives we experience all manner of ups and downs. Sometimes strong feelings result, and we have a natural tendency to be compelled by them. The more intense the feeling, the more compelling it seems.

But there is no necessary correlation between the intensity of a feeling and the truth of your thinking. None. Zero. Nada. A person can be 100% mistaken and feel utterly righteous about their point of view at the same time.

And here’s the deal. When we’re in the grip of intense feelings, our ability to see the truth by reflecting on what’s going on is impaired. We’re not likely to find the truth by thinking longer or harder about things, at least not until we’ve settled way down.

Understanding this can save huge amounts of wear and tear on your relationships, including your relationship with your business or career. The thing to do when you’re extremely worked up is to wait. Let your mind get quiet. No matter what the situation, the wisdom and insight you need to make a good decision will come from being settled down, not from letting strong feelings sway you.

There’s no need to deny or argue with how you feel. You don’t actually need to have an opinion about it. Just know enough to defer action until your thoughts are quieter.

It really is that simple.

Have a wonderful, wonder-filled week, and please let me know what’s in your heart by sharing it in the comments.

Love,

mollysig125

Two Kinds of Not Knowing: Confusion and Wonder

The ability to simply not know is key to having new thought. I first learned of not knowing from Charlie Badenhop of Seishindo. From him I learned of the importance of engaging with not knowing with an open mind, heart, and body. To not know in this way invites wonder–a very different thing from the style of not-knowing typified by confusion.

When we experience not knowing as confusion, the aperture through which we perceive possibilities shrinks. When we simply don’t know in a state of wonder, it is as if we are expanding the aperture through which we perceive both external and internal, material and metaphysical reality. We have new thoughts. We see new connections.

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