In which I recount my great cat box insight: in any given moment you either want to clean the cat box or you don’t. Pretending that you are not doing what you choose to do just makes things unnecessarily complicated.

Put down the weapon, keep the insight

Last week I introduced the notion of weaponized insights. I said that a weaponized insight is no longer operating as an insight, because as soon as it is twisted into a comment on your wholeness, value, or deservingness, it is not longer insightful.

There’s another level to this. The more clearly you see that playing the game of whether or not you are good enough is always a dead end, the more clearly you distinguish between weapons and insights. In time you can put down the weapon and keep the insight.

The Art of Living: Creating Magic and Meaning in Life and Work starts April 26th. Click here for details on this 12-week program for tapping into the deeper intelligence available to every human being, an intelligence that will guide you in the creation of what you want in life, whether you think it is possible at the outset or not.

A weaponized insight is not an insight

A participant in the Come Alive and Do the Thing! group came up with a terrific term for insights that people offer you (of that you offer yourself) that are wrapped in the message that there is something wrong with you. She calls them weaponized insights.

And here’s the deal: a weaponized insight is no longer operating as an insight. It’s operating as a weapon. As soon as insight becomes twisted into a comment on your wholeness, value, or deservingness, it is not longer insightful.

Insights point toward truth. Anything that suggests that there is something wrong with you or that you are not wholly valuable just as you are is a weapon, not an insight.

The Art of Living: Creating Magic and Meaning in Life and Work starts April 26th. Click here for details on this 12-week program for tapping into the deeper intelligence available to every human being, an intelligence that will guide you in the creation of what you want in life, whether you think it is possible at the outset or not.

Worrying doesn’t help; not worrying doesn’t hurt

The title says it all, except for this: “No, really.” In every situation, including horrific ones, worrying doesn’t help. Caring helps. Love helps. And the less we worry, the clearer our minds and freer our hearts to express caring and love.

Click here to learn about my newest program, The Art of Living: Creating Magic and Meaning in Life and Work. Save $100 when you sign up before April 21, 2016.

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