Can you have a quiet mind even when you’re really busy?

Most of us live in the illusion that it’s difficult to have a quiet mind if you are really busy. We have grown accustomed to the idea that busy-mindedness is a natural consequence of being busy. There is an implicit assumption that some amount of stress, pressure, and tension simply go with the territory of having a lot to do.

Well, it ain’t necessarily so. There is no inherent stress, tension, or pressure in having a lot to do. The stress, pressure, and tension come 100% from Thought, not from circumstances.

Given that many of us live in a culture of busy-mindedness and are steeped in the habit of expecting a busy mind to go with a busy life, it is natural that we would fall for the illusion that the stress, tension, and pressure are coming from the outside. But they just aren’t.

You can “do busy” without being busy-minded

Most of us live in the illusion that it’s difficult to have a quiet mind if you are really busy. We have grown accustomed to the idea that busy-mindedness is a natural consequence of being busy. There is an implicit assumption that some amount of stress, pressure, and tension simply go with the territory of having a lot to do.

But stress and busy-mindedness don’t come from having a lot to do

Stress, tension, and pressure are not an inevitable product of having a lot to do. The stress, pressure, and tension that we feel, when we feel them, come 100% from Thought, not from circumstances.

You can test this for yourself

Most of us can readily think of times when it seemed like stress was coming to us courtesy of our circumstances. Yet when my clients give themselves space to reflect, they invariably find instances when they were extremely productive and juggling multiple calls on their time and attention without being busy-minded.

That couldn’t ever happen if stress was actually inherent in certain situations, experiences, or circumstances.

It’s easy to overlook

We may overlook the absence of stress for the simple reason that we aren’t wired to notice what isn’t there. Yet the more you reflect, the more you are likely to observe multiple times each week when you handle what is right in front of you in the moment without being preoccupied by all the other possible things you might be doing, have just done, or could be doing next.

Play with it

Play with it. See if you can recall times when you have had a quiet mind even though you have had a lot to do. Then see if you can remember times when you have had a busy mind with lots of stress and tension even though you didn’t necessarily have a lot to do. (Don’t get me started!)

Then tell me what you observe. As always I welcome your comments, questions, and push back. If this has been helpful, please share it with friends and colleagues.

If you’d like to do more with less busy-mindedness, check out The Art of Living

The Art of Living is a 12-week encounter with the possibility of high engagement and low stress. In a small group (maximum 12), we will tap the deeper intelligence available to every human being, an intelligence that will guide you in the creation of what you want in life, whether you think it is possible at the outset or not.

Starts November 9, 2017Click here for details.

 

What I got wrong about the Three Principles

When I first came across the Three Principles as articulated by theosopher Sydney Banks, I thought I had found the escape hatch for everything stressful and painful in life. I was both right and wrong. This video is a first shot at pointing at what I misunderstood and an invitation to you to ask questions.

At first I thought understanding the Three Principles would inoculate me against the human experience. Upon deeper examination, I’ve come to see that understanding the Three Principles frees me to take the whole being-a-human ride as it comes, exulting in the highs and meeting the lows with grace. The more deeply we see into the inside out nature of experience, the less there is to fear in any experience, happy or sad, bold or afraid.

Do please share your thoughts and questions each week. You can use the comments here on the blog or drop me an email at molly@shaboominc.com. ♥

The incredible, innocent goofiness of waiting for the other shoe to drop

When my clients begin to see the principles behind how their experience is created moment to moment, they start experiencing more wellbeing. Sometimes they are startled by the degree to which their state of mind improves, and they worry about holding onto it. As one client said this morning, “I keep waiting for the other shoe to drop.”

Here’s the deal.

There’s no shoe.

There’s only the experience you are having right now in this moment.

Sure, you could have any number of experiences in the future, and you may have experiences you (think) you don’t like. But so what? Does it really make sense to give more weight and significance to a possible unpleasant feeling in the future than you give to your good feeling right now?

It’s a bit like backing away from a gorgeous table of gourmet delicacies because you can’t be sure what’s on the menu tomorrow.

I say it a bit differently in the video, and I’d love to hear how it lands with you. Please share in the comments. ♥

One universal problem; one universal hope

The Three Principles account for two things that every human being has in common with every other human being:

  • The infinite potential for new thought in every moment.
  • The only thing any of us is ever up against is our own thinking.

As we see this more deeply, we naturally experience more patience, compassion, and understanding for ourselves and others.

Don’t take my word for it. Notice where new thought has arisen in your experience in apparently unlikely circumstances. What if that potential for new thought is something you could depend on? How would that change the way you approached your most difficult problems?

 

It’s not life that’s going so fast, it’s your thinking

It’s easy to think that life speeds up and slows down–that sometimes it’s just nuts “out there” and sometimes it’s not. But life doesn’t go fast or slow; life simply unfolds moment to moment. What speeds up and slows down is our thinking. There’s nothing to fix here, just something to see, and when you see it, you tend not to find your speeded up thinking so compelling.

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